Can activity analytics support understanding engagement a measurable process? Inspiration from @birdahonk

I was pleased to find out my revised paper on this topic was accepted for publication in the September issue of the Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education. The basic premise of the paper is that engagement can be measured as a metric through the appropriation of ideas commonly used in social marketing metrics. For this post I’ll briefly discuss how I approached this by presenting engagement as a learning theory using the ideas of Freire and Vygotsky, as a process, and as a metric. I’ll also share my workshop slides from the conference if you want to try and create your own learner engagement profile. While I’ve started looking into different approaches, this post summarises some of the key principles developed throughout the paper that have guided my thinking of engagement.

UVUEngagement as a learning theory

The paper proposes a concept of engagement that draws on the work of Paolo Freire and Lev Vygotsky and the evolution of the learner voice. The first aspect of this is to re-position the learner as the subject within education and not the object of education, supplanting previous models which portray the learner as a passive recipient of pre-packaged knowledge. The second aspect is understanding the learner voice as a creative (Freire) and spontaneous (Vygotksy) expression within a socialised teaching-learning process that supports dialectical interactions between learner and teacher curiosity. This positions engagement as the process of recognising and respecting the learner’s world, which as Freire reveals is after all the ‘primary and inescapable face of the world itself’ in order to support the development of higher-order thinking skills. The repression of this voice is likely to result in patterns of inertia, non-engagement and alienation that are discussed widely in motivation and engagement literature. This triangulation between motivation and engagement remains a theme central to a range of learning analytics research. Correlation between learning and autonomy remains an interesting area of research.

Engagement as Process

For the paper I used Haven’s engagement process model and overlaid it with concepts from engagement literature reviews by Fredricks, Blumenfeld, & Paris (2004) and Trowler (2010)Haven posits that engagement is the new metric that supersedes previous linear metaphors encompassing the quantitative data of site visits, the qualitative data of surveys and performance, as well as the fuzzy data in between that represents social media. Haven and Vittel elaborate this into an expansive process that link four components of engagement: involvement, interaction, intimacy, and influence through the key stages of discovery, evaluation, use, and affinity (see below). To appropriate this into the educational literature research of Fredricks et al. one can explore examples of involvement and interaction as behavioural engagement, intimacy as emotional engagement, and influence as cognitive engagement. Furthermore when considering whether engagement is high or low in each component, Trowler’s categorisation of negative engagement, non-engagement, and positive engagement can be adopted. Engagement Process

Engagement as a metric

Learner Dashboard

The goal of positioning this as a metric was to create a learner engagement profile, similar to Haven’s engagement profile for marketing. I used Stevenson’s (2008) Pedagogical Model and Conole and Fill’s (2005) Task Type Taxonomy as ways of classifying log data and social network analysis to understand interactions between the different course actors. These were used to form dashboards such as the example above that could then be used to understand profiles, such as the one below (name fictionalised). One insight is that where simple raw VLE data might have suggested an engaged learner who is regularly online and features centrally in discussions, the engagement profile reveals the possibility of a learner who may lack academic support during their time online (evenings) and demonstrating a pattern of alienation based on an apparently strategic approach within an environment that is heavily structured through teacher-led inscription. Given the number of users who have not logged in or have yet to post to the discussions it might also seem sensible to target other learners for engagement interventions, however this would miss opportunities, revealed in the engagement profile, to provide useful support interventions targeting improved learner voice.

Engagement Profile

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